Skylar DeVos


Apprenticeship and No Fake Work

At a recent professional development session, one of the participants asked about the concept of apprenticeship in our curriculum. What did we mean by that, and where could that “apprenticeship” be found? Taking an inquiry-based approach, I could say that there are many possible answers to that question, some better supported than others. Instead, though, it had me thinking about the Inquiry By Design slogan, “No fake work.” One of the highlights of Inquiry By Design is that students are […]

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Texts as Tools for Thinking: The Topic is Not the Message

The study of literature presents interesting difficulties for teachers and students. More than most subjects, literature invites interpretation and introspection on the part of the reader—it raises questions, offers ideas for consideration, and challenges assumptions—and a text can be “difficult” for different reasons. Sometimes, it is simply a matter of dated language, but other times, the difficulty lies in the shape of the stories and characters themselves.

Inquiry By Design is not a “one-note” curriculum. Our texts contain selections that tend […]

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Chunking Texts for Better Understanding

While teachers sometimes chunk texts to increase accessibility and understanding, having students do the chunking work themselves brings far greater results. Take a look at the latest installment in our Tips and Tricks for Inquiry-Based Teaching video blog.

 

 

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Independent Reading

With everything else we need to “cover” in a class period, it’s easy to let independent reading time slide from the agenda.  However, volumes of research shows that if we make time for reading then there will likely be less instruction and “coverage” needed. Here’s one small snippet from those those volumes.

Beers, K. (2003). When kids can’t read: What teachers can do. Henemann. (Original work published 1999)

“The Commission on Reading, the group that prepared the report Becoming a Nation of […]

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But What If No One Talks? | Part 2 of 2

Click here to read Part 1 of this series.

“It’s all in the wrist,” golfers say. Or is it pitchers? Maybe I’m thinking of ping pong. At any rate, there comes a point when working out how to improve discussion in your classroom means fine-tuning some intricate details.

Since there’s a bit of personal preference involved, maybe a better analogy is when you go to the eye doctor and have to look through all of the different lenses. Which looks better to […]

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